Thursday, November 26, 2020

Thanksgiving at Memmie’s Farm (by Steve Orr ... inspired by Deuteronomy 8:7-18)

We woke up excited. 

Today, we knew, would be different. Our usual days were simple. We lived in a tiny house, on a busy corner, in an unzoned neighborhood. I don’t mean to imply we were poor; just that there were no frills in our day-to-day lives. Money went for necessities; there wasn’t any extra. And in this, we weren’t that different from our relatives. Some had a little more; some a little less. But for all of us, Thanksgiving was a day of plenty. Likely, all the children in all their houses were waking up just like us: energized and ready to go.

First, it was the start of a four-day weekend; no school and, usually, no homework. Second, or maybe this should’ve been first, we were going to Memmie’s! It’s not like we never went to Memmie’s. It just that Thanksgiving at Memmie’s farm was always special. Other visits usually involved doing chores or helping out in some way —there was always something that needed fixing, feeding, planting, harvesting, painting, moved, or mowed— after all, Memmie, who was Mama’s grandmother, was quite elderly. But we knew not to bring that up. It was a sore spot: Memmie living out there all by herself. Or as good as; Aunt Lucy, younger but frailer, was almost no help. That’s what the grownups said when they were sure neither of the sisters could hear. Besides, Lucy lived out back in the little house, also alone. How much help could she be if Memmie needed someone in the night?

None of that was on our minds that Thanksgiving morning, as we dressed for cool weather and helped load side dishes into the backseat of our car. Dad, then, pulled down the station wagon’s tailgate, and we piled pillows and blankets into the cargo space ... and the two of us climbed in with them. Once Dad closed us in, we formed pillows and blankets into makeshift seats. A big part of the fun on that journey was riding backwards and looking out the rear window. It was a special treat on a special day. 

Memmie’s farm was one town over and out in the country. It seemed a long drive to us kids. We were encouraged to keep ourselves occupied with I Spy and spotting out-of-state license plates. We also watched for the Burma Shave signs; reading them backwards was a sure bet to send us into giggles. 

Our biggest hope was that we weren’t the first ones to arrive: that meant we had to “help out” instead of play. Better to be second, or even third. That way, the number of cousins reached the critical mass where parents wanted us out from under foot. Soon enough, we made enough racket that some grownup shouted, “No horseplay in the house!” This, of course, was shortly followed by the phrase we longed to hear: “You kids go outside!”

Outside was cold, but we were all dressed for it. Besides, in no time, we were playing tag, climbing trees, running back to see the chickens, or grinding seed corn in the crib. Cold? What cold? We kept up these kinds of things until, magically, it was time for lunch. My grandmother would step out on the big, raised front porch and call, “Dinnn-ER!

And the stampede began. 

We all ate until we were full ... and then we ate some more. There was, of course, Turkey; a huge thing, with lots of jostling to see who could get one of the giant drumsticks, usually two of the older kids. We didn’t stuff our turkeys; we ate pan-roasted dressing with giblet gravy. There were always other meats, as well; baked ham, fried chicken. As big as that turkey was, it couldn’t stretch to feed our whole tribe. Side dishes included cranberry salad and cranberry sauce, sweet potato casserole, green bean casserole, mashed potatoes, creamed corn, deviled eggs, three-bean salad, hot biscuits, “regular” green beans (fork tender), corn-on-the-cob, and fruit salad. Plus, there were always a few surprise dishes from the more adventurous cooks. 

Then, after trying to eat at least a little of everything, we, somehow, crammed in some dessert. Pecan pie was the king of the day, but its court included pumpkin, apple, and cherry pies; plus various cream pies (with meringue piled high), and even some cakes. And, if I was lucky, someone brought a chess pie. There were a limited number of these desserts; so, you really couldn’t sample them all. We had to set priorities and go for those if we wanted to eat what tickled our palate.

In the afternoon, we all drifted into the living room where Memmie’s pot bellied, coal burning stove held pride of place. It was way too hot for us kids in the middle of that room —plenty warm enough on the edges— so we steered clear of it unless pressed into coal loading service. Eventually, though, the lethargy of our meal began to wear off and we were once again herded outside to “run it off.” As the sun began to move down the western sky, we started to actually notice the falling temps. This was nowhere more noticeable than when we had to visit the outhouse; now, that was cold! But, at least everyone, young or old, had to make the same trek for the same reasons.

Finally, dusk crept into our day and it was time for leftovers. We streamed to the big table in the kitchen, but not with quite the gusto of lunch. We had, in fact, run off the earlier meal, but we were starting the return to our usual lives; sandwiches were enough for that supper. As darkness arrived, we were all pressed into service for the cleanup. Extra tables and chairs were loaded into car trunks, as were a portion of the leftovers; everyone left with lots of food regardless how little or much they brought.

The two of us rejoined our backward-facing nest for the trip home; but with little to see at night, we soon fell asleep in the back of the station wagon, nestled among our blankets and pillows. My final memory of the day was of rousing a tiny bit as I was being carried from the car to the bed, feeling warmed, and filled, and loved.

Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Thanksgiving at Memmie’s Farm (by Steve Orr)

We woke up excited. 

Today, we knew, would be different. Our usual days were simple. We lived in a tiny house, on a busy corner, in an unzoned neighborhood. I don’t mean to imply we were poor; just that there were no frills in our day-to-day lives. Money went for necessities; there wasn’t any extra. And in this, we weren’t that different from our relatives. Some had a little more; some a little less. But for all of us, Thanksgiving was a day of plenty. Likely, all the children in all their houses were waking up just like us: energized and ready to go.

First, it was the start of a four-day weekend; no school and, usually, no homework. Second, or maybe this should’ve been first, we were goingg to Memmie’s! It’s not like we never went to Memmie’s. It just that Thanksgiving at Memmie’s farm was always special. Other visits usually involved doing chores or helping out in some way —there was always something that needed fixing, feeding, planting, harvesting, painting, moved, or mowed— after all, Memmie, who was Mama’s grandmother, was quite elderly. But we knew not to bring that up. It was a sore spot: Memmie living out there all by herself. Or as good as; Aunt Lucy, younger but frailer, was almost no help. That’s what the grownups said when they were sure neither of the sisters could hear. Besides, Lucy lived out back in the little house, also alone. How much help could she be if Memmie needed someone in the night?

None of that was on our minds that Thanksgiving morning, as we dressed for cool weather and helped load side dishes into the backseat of our car. Dad, then, pulled down the station wagon’s tailgate, and we piled pillows and blankets into the cargo space ... and the two of us climbed in with them. Once Dad closed us in, we formed pillows and blankets into makeshift seats. A big part of the fun on that journey was riding backwards and looking out the rear window. It was a special treat on a special day. 

Memmie’s farm was one town over and out in the country. It seemed a long drive to us kids. We were encouraged to keep ourselves occupied with I Spy and spotting out-of-state license plates. We also watched for the Burma Shave signs; reading them backwards was a sure bet to send us into giggles. 

Our biggest hope was that we weren’t the first ones to arrive: that meant we had to “help out” instead of play. Better to be second, or even third. That way, the number of cousins reached the critical mass where parents wanted us out from under foot. Soon enough, we made enough racket that some grownup shouted, “No horseplay in the house!” This, of course, was shortly followed by the phrase we longed to hear: “You kids go outside!”

Outside was cold, but we were all dressed for it. Besides, in no time, we were playing tag, climbing trees, running back to see the chickens, or grinding seed corn in the crib. Cold? What cold? We kept up these kinds of things until, magically, it was time for lunch. My grandmother would step out on the big, raised front porch and call, “Dinnn-ER!

And the stampede began. 

We all ate until we were full ... and then we ate some more. There was, of course, Turkey; a huge thing, with lots of jostling to see who could get one of the giant drumsticks, usually two of the older kids. We didn’t stuff our turkeys; we ate pan-roasted dressing with giblet gravy. There were always other meats, as well; baked ham, fried chicken. As big as that turkey was, it couldn’t stretch to feed our whole tribe. Side dishes included cranberry salad and cranberry sauce, sweet potato casserole, green bean casserole, mashed potatoes, creamed corn, deviled eggs, three-bean salad, hot biscuits, “regular” green beans (fork tender), corn-on-the-cob, and fruit salad. Plus, there were always a few surprise dishes from the more adventurous cooks. 

Then, after trying to eat at least a little of everything, we, somehow, crammed in some dessert. Pecan pie was the king of the day, but its court included pumpkin, apple, and cherry pies; plus various cream pies (with meringue piled high), and even some cakes. And, if I was lucky, someone brought a chess pie. There were a limited number of these desserts; so, you really couldn’t sample them all. We had to set priorities and go for those if we wanted to eat what tickled our palate.

In the afternoon, we all drifted into the living room where Memmie’s pot bellied, coal burning stove held pride of place. It was way too hot for us kids in the middle of that room —plenty warm enough on the edges— so we steered clear of it unless pressed into coal loading service. Eventually, though, the lethargy of our meal began to wear off and we were once again herded outside to “run it off.” As the sun began to move down the western sky, we started to actually notice the falling temps. This was nowhere more noticeable than when we had to visit the outhouse; now, that was cold! But, at least everyone, young or old, had to make the same trek for the same reasons.

Finally, dusk crept into our day and it was time for leftovers. We streamed to the big table in the kitchen, but not with quite the gusto of lunch. We had, in fact, run off the earlier meal, but we were starting the return to our usual lives; sandwiches were enough for that supper. As darkness arrived, we were all pressed into service for the cleanup. Extra tables and chairs were loaded into car trunks, as were a portion of the leftovers; everyone left with lots of food regardless how little or much they brought.

The two of us rejoined our backward-facing nest for the trip home; but with little to see at night, we soon fell asleep in the back of the station wagon, nestled among our blankets and pillows. My final memory of the day was of rousing a tiny bit as I was being carried from the car to the bed, feeling warmed, and filled, and loved.

_________________________
PHOTO: Steve Orr


Warm wishes to you and yours as we pause to give thanks. The reflection is inspired by this week’s Thanksgiving scriptures, particularly the Deuteronomy passage. DaySpring isn’t hosting a Lectionary Breakfast, this week. Enjoy your holiday and join us the first Friday in December.

Blessings,
Steve

SCRIPTURES FOR THANKSGIVING DAY
Thanksgiving Day, USA (November 26, 2020)

Deuteronomy 8:7-18
Psalm 65
2 Corinthians 9:6-15
Luke 17:11-19

SCRIPTURES FOR THE FIRST WEEK OF ADVENT

Isaiah 64:1-9
Psalm 80:1-7, 17-19
1 Corinthians 1:3-9
Mark 13:24-37

Friday, November 20, 2020

Space-X and the Space Station Boogie (a Steve Orr scripture reflection)

Like the steps of a complex dance.

Space-X just made big news by launching NASA astronauts toward a rendezvous with the International Space Station. It’s the first, official time a commercial enterprise has ferried astronauts to the orbiting platform. It’s a big deal ... and a big change in how the USA goes to space. 


But some things don’t change.


Every rocket launching for the International Space Station (ISS), whether it belongs to a country or to a company, must do one thing, and must do it exactly right: dock.


When a craft needs to dock with the ISS, there has always been a strict procedure to which it must adhere.


  1.  Launch ... orbit for days
  2. Arrive at start position ... wait
  3. Get permission to advance
  4. Advance about 50 yards ... wait 
  5. Use nose and tail rockets to alter pitch and yaw
  6. Wait for permission to advance 
  7. Maneuver within about 33 feet of ISS
  8. Wait for permission to advance 
  9. Proceed about 2 inches per second toward ISS
  10. Dock
  11. Wait 2 hours to match pressures
  12. Enter ISS

It was a long and complicated process, made even longer by the fact that fresh permissions must be obtained at multiple points before proceeding. 


I think most of us believe getting to God works this way: full speed toward God; stop and wait; get more permissions; slow our approach; stop again; get even more permissions. And then, right when we think we have finally made it, jumped through all the hoops ... we, again, have to wait.


We think we’re like the rocket, doing all the work to connect with God. We see God like the ISS, floating majestically out in space, just awaiting our approach. At one time it certainly seemed like that. There were priests, sacrifices, and rituals through which people had to pass before they could connect to God.


But, the old way of docking with the International Space Station no longer applies. Instead of several days, advances in technology allowed SpaceX to take those astronauts from launchpad to docking in less that 30 hours. 


And, God is not waiting for us to execute a painstaking series of maneuvers in order to approach him. He is searching for us, looking down the road, ready to run to us at first sighting. That is the spirit of this week's Ezekiel and Psalm 95 selections, as well as many other Bible passages. 


So, start your approach ... God will take care of the docking.



_________________________

Very different versions of this reflection appeared in November 2014 and 2017.


PHOTO (and info on the NASA/SpaceX collaboration, Resilience): 

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-s-spacex-crew-1-astronauts-headed-to-international-space-station/


The SpaceX ISS Docking: 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/11/16/spacex-crew-dragon-docking-iss-live-updates/?outputType=amp


More about how docking with the ISS works:

http://www.howitworksdaily.com/docking-with-the-iss/

_________________________


Join us Friday morning on Zoom for DaySpring’s Lectionary Breakfast. We start at 8:00 and dance our way through the scriptures ahead of Sunday’s sermon. 


Let me know if you want to attend. I’ll send you the Zoom link and tell our gatekeeper to let you in. 


NOTE: Zoom allows you mute the camera if you don’t wish to be seen and to mute the microphone if you don’t wish to speak. 

Blessings,
Steve

SCRIPTURES FOR THE COMING WEEK

Find them here: https://lectionary.library.vanderbilt.edu//texts.php?id=170


Ezekiel 34:11-16, 20-24
Psalm 100
Psalm 95:1-7a
Ephesians 1:15-23
Matthew 25:31-46

(November 22, 2020) Twenty-Fifth Sunday after Pentecost

REIGN OF CHRIST Proper 29 (34)

Friday, November 13, 2020

The Warrior Code of the Samurai (a Steve Orr scripture reflection)


Is everyone in Japan a warrior?

In feudal Japan, “Samurai” referred to a “retainer;” that is, someone who accompanied a Lord, had pledged fealty to that Lord, and served that Lord in close attendance. 


It means, essentially, “to wait upon the Lord.” 


The Hagakure is a Japanese book that captures this warrior code of the samurai. It is a practical and spiritual guide for the warrior. It has been said of the Hagakure that it is Japan; that it captures the heart of all that truly matters to their culture.  


So ... is everyone in Japan a warrior?  


Well, no. But everyone is, in their world view, either a Lord or a Retainer. There are few Lords and many Retainers. A book delving into what makes one the ideal retainer could easily be the heart of the culture. It’s enough to make me wonder what it is about this book  —on the surface about warriors—  that makes it the cultural guide for almost everyone in the country. 


What, then, is this warrior code of the Samurai?


As with many things in life, it’s simple: everyone, from the most skilled to the least, can hold a place of honor in the culture. To quote the Hagakure: "...even a person who is good for nothing and exceedingly clumsy will be a reliable retainer if only he has the determination to think earnestly of his master."


If only the slothful (frightened?) servant in this week's Matthew 25 selection had been able to access the Hagakure. Perhaps if he had been keeping his mind fixed on what was best for his master, he would have made a better choice concerning the talent he had.  


The lesson for us?


When we stop focusing on what could go wrong, and instead focus on what God intended for us to do with our talents, we should be able to make the wise choice.


We need only think earnestly of our master.


_________________________

PHOTO: Steve Orr


Considerably different versions of this reflection appeared in 2014 and 2017.

_________________________


Some interesting reading about Japan’s most popular (fictional) Samurai, “Lone Wolf and Cub”: https://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/2016/10/08/books/book-reviews/lone-wolf-cub-japans-greatest-samurai-manga/#.WhDHL2hMGEc


More about the Hagakurehttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/277950.Hagakure


_________________________

Lectionary Breakfast is a fun and interesting way to start the weekend. We dig into the scriptures for the coming Sunday, ask questions and seek their relevance for our lives. Join us Friday morning on ZOOM at 8:00 for an hour like no other.


Let me know ahead of time if you want to attend. I will send you the Zoom link and alert our gatekeeper to let you in. 


NOTE: Zoom allows you mute the camera if you do not wish to be seen and to mute the microphone if you do not wish to speak. 

Blessings,
Steve


SCRIPTURES FOR THE COMING WEEK

Find (and print) them here: https://lectionary.library.vanderbilt.edu//


Judges 4:1-7
Psalm 123
Zephaniah 1:7, 12-18
Psalm 90:1-8, (9-11), 12
1 Thessalonians 5:1-11
Matthew 25:14-30


Saturday, November 7, 2020

No Turning Back (a Steve Orr scripture reflection)

Something pretty important to the history of the world happened in 49 BC. That was the year a fellow named “Julius” decided to add “Caesar” to his name.  


Julius led his army to the edge of a small river, the Rubicon. As long as they stayed on the northeast side of the river, all would be as it had been. But should they decided to cross the Rubicon, well ... civil war would break out. The penalty for just crossing that river would be death, not only for Julius, but for every soldier in his service.

Whatever choice Julius made would have consequences. If he decided to stay on his side of the Rubicon, nothing would change ... and change was needed. If he did cross the Rubicon, everything would change ... and there would be no turning back. 

It was, truly, the point of no return.

Today, when someone uses the phrase, "cross the Rubicon," we understand there is no actual river involved. When we say that, we mean a decision must be made that cannot be taken back. Once made, we will have to face the consequences of the decision ... and live with them from that moment on. 

But don't be fooled: not making the decision is also a decision. And the consequences for not choosing may be just as costly ... maybe more so.

That’s what’s happening in this week's selection from Joshua 24. 

Joshua first calls together all the leaders of Israel. He reminds them of all God has done for them: the exodus from their slavery in Egypt, the provision of their needs during the wilderness years, and the gift of the Promised Land. 

Then, Joshua invites them to "cross the Rubicon."

"...choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve ... as for me and my house, we will serve the LORD.” 

God wants each of us to make that choice, too. Will we commit to God or will we choose another path? It’s a decision we make of our own free will. Do we yield our hearts as the Israelites were asked to do; or do we, by action or inaction, decide to do something else?   

Each of us comes to our own Rubicon, our moment of decision. Do we turn back? Or do we cross it ... 

and change everything?

_________________________
PHOTO: Steve Orr

A very different version of this reflection appeared in 2014.
_________________________

Join us Friday morning on ZOOM at 8:00 for DaySpring’s Lectionary Breakfast ... BYOB (Bring Your Own Breakfast!). Whether you’re eating, or just enjoying a morning beverage of your choice, the real feast is the time in the scripture and the fellowship with one another.

Contact me ahead of time so I can give you the Zoom link and alert our Gatekeeper to let you in. 

NOTE: Zoom allows you mute the camera if you do not wish to be seen and to mute the microphone if you do not wish to speak. 

Enjoy the week!
Steve

SCRIPTURES FOR THE COMING WEEK

Proper 27 (32) (November 8, 2020)
Joshua 24:1-3a, 14-25
Psalm 78:1-7
Amos 5:18-24
Psalm 70
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18
Matthew 25:1-13



Saturday, October 31, 2020

Zombies at the Resurrection? (a Steve Orr scripture reflection)

On the screen, the decaying bodies rise from their graves and move inexorably forward in a shuffling parody of human walking. The plucky heroes and heroines run to hiding places, but can never shake the tide of zombies following them. What’s tips them off? Sound? Smell? Something about truly live humans draws these “walking dead” to their hiding places with unerring accuracy.

That is how we tend to think of the walking dead: as Zombies. That’s the Halloween version, anyway. How else would it be? Dead people do not get up out of their graves and just walk away ... Or do they?

Our thoughts on the subject change as we round the corner from Halloween (All Hallows Eve) on 10/31 to the next day: All Saints Day. That’s when we think of the true resurrection. Like Dia de los Muertos (the Day of the Dead, celebrated on the same day in Mexico and throughout Latin America), All Saints Day is when we honor our loved ones who have died. 

This week’s All Saints Day scriptures reference that time when Jesus will return, the saints will gather in heaven and stand before the Throne of God, and we will “be like him.” This is “the resurrection” at which Martha believed she would one day see her dead brother Lazarus. But Jesus told her, “I am the resurrection.” Then, he raised her brother from his grave to rejoin the living ... right then.

Throughout the New Testament, Jesus and the apostles returned dead people to life ...those people arose and walked. Perhaps the strangest resurrection episode, though, takes place during the three days Jesus was in the grave. Matthew 27:50-53 states that immediately after Jesus died, graves opened and the “holy ones” returned to life. 

They arose. But these were no zombies! 

These folk were restored to their lives. After Jesus’ resurrection, these “holy ones” walked into Jerusalem and “appeared to many people.” It was a for-real “dia de los [walking] muertos”; another miracle awaiting that first Easter morning to take a stroll.

The power of Jesus to raise the dead was so great, it blasted out into graveyards at the moment of His death. When “the resurrection” is present, there is no waiting ... people come to life!

And now? We’re just waiting for Him to be present once more ... when we will all rise. 

_________________________


PHOTO: Steve Orr

Very different versions of this reflection appeared in prior years

_________________________
Can you join us Friday morning at DaySpring’s Lectionary Breakfast? We gather on ZOOM at 8:00 for food, fellowship, prayer ... and some quality time hammering out how to use the scriptures to ensure we walk the walk, not just talk the talk.

Contact me ahead of time so I can (1) give you the Zoom link, and (2) alert our gatekeeper to let you into our Zoom call.

NOTE: Zoom allows you to mute the microphone if you do not wish to speak and mute the camera if you do not wish to be seen. 

Blessings,
Steve

SCRIPTURES FOR THE COMING WEEK
All Saints Day (November 1, 2020)

Revelation 7:9-17
Psalm 34:1-10, 22
1 John 3:1-3
Matthew 5:1-12
________
Proper 26 (31) (Sunday, November 1, 2020)

Joshua 3:7-17
Psalm 107:1-7, 33-37
Micah 3:5-12
Psalm 43
1 Thessalonians 2:9-13
Matthew 23:1-12


Saturday, October 24, 2020

There Can Be Only One (a Steve Orr scripture reflection)

My title is the catch phrase from The Highlander movies and TV shows. And, while that may be true for sword wielding immortals, I can’t say the same for my favorites. I’m always stuck when I’m asked to name “my favorite” one anything.

 What about you? Do you have a wide range of favorites? Or, can you answer with one thing when they ask? I can’t seem to pick just one favorite thing.

I have favorite foods, coffees, teas, movies, songs, instrumental music pieces, books, authors, actors, TV shows, people, places, countries, campgrounds, ocean cruises ... but, they’re all plural. 

Here’s a few examples: 

Music: I’ll Stand By You (“Nothing you confess could make me love you less.”); In the MoodClair de LuneCristofori’s Dream, classic Jazz, and You’re So Vain (because, well ... it’s about me).

Books: Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles, Ian Rankin’s Rebus novels. Plus Robert Heinlein, Stephen King, Orson Scott Card, Janet Evanovich, Sue Grafton....

TV & movies: Joe vs the Volcano, Sean Connery in OutlandDownton AbbyA Walk in the CloudsThe OrvilleThe Education of Little Tree, noir films, and classic Disney. 

So, with all that, it’s probably not a surprise I have a few candidates for favorite scripture. 
I try to live by Proverbs 3:5-6 (“Trust in the LORD with all your heart, And lean not on your own understanding; In all your ways acknowledge Him, And He shall direct your paths.”). 
My faith is strengthened by Hebrews 11:1 (“Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.”). 
I measure my spiritual journey progress by Matthew 25:40 (Jesus speaking: “I tell you the truth, when you did it to one of the least of these my brothers and sisters, you were doing it to me!”). 
I take hope from Lamentations 3:22-24 (Jeremiah speaking: “The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases; his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness. ‘The Lord is my portion,’ says my soul, ‘therefore I will hope in him.”)

But, unlike many other parts of my life, I actually have one favorite scripture: the one in this week’s Matthew passage (“You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the great and first commandment. And a second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. On these two commandments depend all the Law and the Prophets.”)

Not only is it the capstone scripture, enfolding all the Law and the Prophets, it is also the most important message in the Bible: God loves me and I love God. God’s love flows into me so I can love my neighbor.

All of the scriptures flow from that one. So, for me, when it comes to favorite scriptures, it’s true: 

There can be only one. 

___________________________

Different versions of this reflection appeared in prior years as My Favorites and These Are A Few of My Favorite Things.


___________________________
Can you be with us, Friday morning, for DaySpring’s Lectionary Breakfast? We gather on Zoom at 8:00 for a wonderful hour of scripture, discussion, and humor. Contact me ahead of time so I can get you the Zoom link and tell our gatekeeper to let you in.

Blessings,
Steve

SCRIPTURES FOR THE COMING WEEK
Proper 25 (30) (October 29, 2017)

Deuteronomy 34:1-12
Psalm 90:1-6, 13-17
Leviticus 19:1-2, 15-18
Psalm 1
1 Thessalonians 2:1-8
Matthew 22:34-46